Extracurricular Activities 4.4.15— Psalms for Easter, Thomistic Protestants, & Shedd’s Trinitarianism

Jeremy Bouma on 3 years ago. Tagged under ,,,,,,,.

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Michael Bird On Preaching the Psalms this Easter

How did the early preach about Jesus if they did not have a New Testament? The obvious answer is that they must have preached from the Old Testament! Of course, it wasn’t ‘old’ to them, it was the only Scripture they knew, the Law, the Prophets, and Writings were God’s Word to Israel. Even so, how do you preach Jesus’ cross and resurrection if you don’t have the Gospel of St. Mark, St. Paul’s epistle to the Romans, the epistle to the Hebrews, of the Revelation of St. John the Divine? Well, they did it, by and large, by going through the Psalms!

As one reads through the New Testament, it becomes clear that the authors detected in the Psalms various pattern and images which reminded them of Jesus, specifically, who he…

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Extracurricular Activities 3.28.15 — Marcion, Christian Stoicism, & Transhumanism

Jeremy Bouma on 3 years ago. Tagged under ,,,,,,,.

jesus

Nancy Pearcey on Apologetics, Cultural Liturgies, and Our Postmodern Age

Yesterday, I began a conversation with Nancy Pearcey about her new book, Finding Truth: 5 Principles for Unmasking Atheism, Secularism, and Other God SubstitutesToday, we continue this discussion and focus on the benefits and limits of worldview training.

Trevin Wax: James K. A. Smith makes the case that worldview analysis isn’t enough when it comes to discipleship, since we are formed by cultural liturgies, not just philosophical beliefs. What are the limits of worldview training?

Dieter Roth on Reading the Sources for Marcion

In my two previous guest blog posts (here and here) considering Marcion’s Gospel, I focused predominantly on issues of reconstructing this text, highlighting, first, problematic issues in Markus Vinzent’s new monograph[1] and, second, the most important methodological considerations when…

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Extracurricular Activities 3.21.15 — Angels and Atonement, Romans 1, and Primary Sources

Jeremy Bouma on 3 years ago. Tagged under ,,,,.

angels

Ben Witherington Asks, “Were Luke and Matthew on the Same Ancestry Page?”

One of the more controversial aspects of the Gospels is the two genealogies we have for Jesus, one in Mt. 1.1-17 the other in Lk. 3.23-38. While there are a few similarities between the two (e.g. they both mention that Jesus is the ‘so-called’ son of Joseph), they are mostly different, and they serve very different purposes. Some Bible students along the way have tried to suggest that we have Mary’s genealogy in Luke, and Joseph’s in Matthew, but this solution simply doesn’t work, since Joseph and his ancestry is referred to in both cases. Matthew clearly says that Jacob begat Joseph, but Luke has the more elliptical phrase ‘Joseph of Heli’, which could possibly mean ‘son of’ or ‘grandson of’ but it depends on what…

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Extracurricular Activities 3.14.15 — Codex Alexandrinus, Moral Beauty, and Church Priviledge

Jeremy Bouma on 3 years ago. Tagged under ,,,,.

codex_alexandrinus

Larry Hurtado on A Newly-Published Study of Codex Alexandrinus

Codex Alexandrinus is a fifth-century “pandect,” that is, the Greek Old Testament and the Greek New Testament writings in one manuscript.  From its original provenance (still uncertain), it came to England in 1627, presented to King Charles I as a gift by the Patriarch of Constantinople, Cyril Lucar, and is now housed in the British Library (London).  Alexandrinus is well known to students of the Greek NT, especially those who study NT textual history and textual variants.  It is the “fountain head” of what became the “Byzantine” text-type of the Gospels.  But, as strange as it may seem, there has been no study of the codex of equivalent depth prior to the newly-published work by  W. Andrew Smith:  A Study of the Gospels in Codex Alexandrinus: Codicology, Palaeography, and Scribal Hands (Leiden: Brill,…

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Extracurricular Activities 3.7.15 — Wright on Cranfield, Inerrancy Summit, & Racial Diversity

Jeremy Bouma on 3 years ago. Tagged under ,,,,,,,.

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N.T. Wright’s Obituary on C.B.E Cranfield

The Reverend Professor Charles E. B. Cranfield, who has died six months short of what would have been his hundredth birthday, was one of the leading British New Testament scholars of the second half of the twentieth century. He taught in Durham for thirty years, as Lecturer (1950-62), Senior Lecturer (1962-66), Reader (1966-78) and finally in what used to be called a ‘personal chair’ (1978-80). (Throughout much of that time Professor C. K. Barrett, younger by two years, was the ‘Professor of New Testament’; Durham, like most universities then, only had one ‘professor’ in each subject.) Barrett and Cranfield lived close to one another on the western slopes of the city of Durham. They observed an old-fashioned courtesy, but students would sometimes detect a slightly frosty atmosphere between two men who were in…

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Extracurricular Activities 2.28.15 — Diversity, the Church and Utopia, & Rural Churches

Jeremy Bouma on 3 years ago. Tagged under ,,,.

Totila_e_San_Benedetto

Michael Bird Explores Paula Fredrikson’s Arguments on Paul and Justification

In the latest issue of JBL is an article by Paula Fredriksen on “Paul’s Letter to the Romans, the Ten Commandments, and Pagan ‘Justification by faith,’” JBL 133.4 (2014): 801-7.

Fredriksen attempts to understand “justification by faith” beyond its usual theological discourse and identify the meaning of the phrase in its original social context. Her starting point is Josephus, Ant. 18.116-19 with John the Baptist’s preaching of “piety” and “righteousness” which correspond to the two tables of the Ten Commandments: commands 1-5 (piety toward God) and commands 6-10 (justice towards others).

Al Mohler Explores Human Diversity and the Biblical Worldview (Part 1)

A prominent question many worldviews and metanarratives are now wrestling with is the question of human diversity. Diversity is a fact that cannot be denied. The insularity…

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Extracurricular Activities 2.21.15 — Another Flood Account, Martyrdom, and Sermon Illustrations

Jeremy Bouma on 3 years ago. Tagged under ,,,,,.

christian_martyrs

Tim Challies Review: Becoming Worldly Saints Recovers Balance in the Christian Life

The pushback against the radical Christian life is in full swing. It was inevitable, I think, and healthy. Books like Radical and Don’t Waste Your Life were meant to battle Christian complacency, but in some ways they over-corrected, giving less than a holistic and realistic view of the Christian life. And now authors like Michael Wittmer are attempting to recover some balance.

(Get a free study guide and small group videos for “Becoming Worldly Saints.”)

Ben Witherington Reports on Another Flood Account

Our fried Pete Williams, the warden of Tyndale House at Cambridge had this recent report on the finding of yet another flood account, this one perhaps from about 1700 B.C. or so. Here’s the report…. ——

The animals went in two by two …

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Extracurricular Activity 2.14.15 — Why Becoming a Worldly Saint is a Good Thing

Jeremy Bouma on 3 years ago. Tagged under ,,,,,,.

worldly_saints

Trevin Wax Interviews Michael Wittmer on New Book Becoming Worldly Saints

Trevin Wax: Your title is provocative. Becoming Worldly Saints is the last thing we want for people, unless we recognize the proper sense of “worldly” versus the improper sense. Can you explain why your title is a good summary for the main point of your book?

Mike Wittmer: The Puritans were called “Worldly Saints” in Leland Ryken’s book by that name, so it may not be as provocative as it sounds. It might just be old-fashioned!

“Worldly Saints” may seem like an oxymoron, but it’s the perfect title for what God calls Christians to be. We must be worldly—enjoying creation, loving friends and family, and excelling in our cultural tasks. All things being equal, Christians should make the best humans. We also must be saints—loving God, fighting sin and…

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Extracurricular Activities 2.7.15 — The Trinity, NT Papyrus, and the Crusades

Jeremy Bouma on 3 years ago. Tagged under ,,,,,,,.

The Baptism of Christ

Michael Bird Asks, “Is the Trinity Biblical?”

In the most recent issues of JETS is a review by Jeffrey A. Stivason of my Evangelical Theology. Its quite a fair review, with a bit of push back, and some nice points of affirmation as well.  Stivason claims that because I am reluctant – unlike B.B. Warfield – to find an explicit Trinitarian affirmation in the NT, that I thereby “weaken rather than strengthen this fundamental doctrine among evangelicals” and contribute to a belief that the Trinity is “the most abstract and impractical of all Christian doctrines.”

Let me say that I believe that the Trinity is “biblical”…

New Testament Papyrus Discovered in University of Birmingham Library

A papyrus witness to the Greek New Testament has been discovered in the Cadbury Research Library of the University of Birmingham.

Following an initial visit last year,…

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Extracurricular Activities 1.31.15 — Mark Mummy Redux, Post-Seculars, and Missions Trips

Jeremy Bouma on 3 years ago. Tagged under ,,,,,,,.

mark_mummy

Justin Taylor Shares Biblical Reasons to Doubt Creation Days Were 24-Hours

R. C. Sproul, who drafted the original Chicago Statement of Biblical Inerrancy, once said, “When people ask me how old the earth is, I tell them I don’t know—because I don’t.”

Contrary to what is often implied or claimed by young-earth creationists, the Bible nowhere directly teaches the age of the earth.

A First-Century Copy of the Gospel of Mark? Hurtado Says Not So Fast

In the last week or so I’ve had a number of inquiries about news stories of the discovery of a fragment of the Gospel of Mark dating to the first century AD.  Actually, this isn’t a new claim, but instead a rehashing (or belated notice) of a story that initially appeared back in early 2012.  But, thanks to an article more recently in “Live Science” (

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Extracurricular Activities 1.24.15 —The Afterlife, the Mark Mummy Mask, What Would Kuyper Do?

Jeremy Bouma on 3 years ago. Tagged under ,,,,,,,.

kuyper

Mike Wittmer Gives 4 Reasons to Stop Obsessing About Heaven 

Alex Malarkey, who co-authored The Boy Who Came Back From Heaven, publicly confessed his story is malarkey. He and his mother had been saying so for some time, but few noticed until last week.

His admission left me wondering why heavenly tourism gets so much attention. Christians might be less obsessed with heaven if we better grasped four things

Scot McKnight on Second Temple Judaism’s Spectrum of the Afterlife

Here is a collection of Jewish texts from the 2d Temple period that show that Judaism knew a spectrum: from an annihilationism to eternal conscious punishment. Into this kind of diversity Jesus and the apostles stepped and spoke of judgment. There is support here for both sides of this debate.

Justin Taylor Outlines 3 Types of Fundamentalists and Evangelicals

On…

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Extracurricular Activities 1.10.15 — Two Takes on the Newsweek Bible Article, Eschatology, More

Jeremy Bouma on 4 years ago. Tagged under ,,,,,.

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Peter Enns Responds to Eichenwald’s Newsweek Article on The Bible

Kurt Eichenwald’s Christmas missive in Newsweek, “The Bible: So Misunderstood It’s A Sin,” has predictably gotten it’s share of strong reactions.

As others have pointed out, Eichenwald’s rhetoric is inflammatory, and his grasp of the issues is second-hand–at points rather naive, at least from the point of view of those who have been around the block a few times on the issues he raises, and especially those who work with the Bible for a living.

But he’s still basically right…

Dan Wallace Responds to Eichenwald’s Newsweek Article on The Bible

Every year, at Christmas and Easter, several major magazines, television programs, news agencies, and publishing houses love to rattle the faith of Christians by proclaiming loudly and obnoxiously that there are contradictions in the Bible, that Jesus…

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