John Calvin: Why He Would Have Embraced Social-Networking
(and Why We Should, too) by Douglas Estes

ZA Blog on 9 years ago. Tagged under ,.

John-Calvin-FB John Calvin is up late reworking some rudiments of the faith and preparing for tomorrow’s lectures.

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There is no doubt that John Calvin, had he lived during our time of blogs and tweets, would have fully embraced social-networking technologies—even though he was not known to be a strongly social person.

By all accounts, John Calvin had a choleric personality. As a result, he had a passion for what he felt was truth, and an unending desire to see that truth known. At times, that made Calvin as pleasurable as sandpaper on bare skin, especially to those with whom he disagreed. Due to the success of his ministry, as well as some of his more visible personality flaws, Calvin’s detractors had a great deal of ammunition to use against him.

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John Calvin, Virtual Church Pioneer by Douglas Estes

ZA Blog on 9 years ago. Tagged under ,.

(Z Academic welcomes author, pastor, and NT scholar, Douglas Estes, for a week long series on Koinonia!)

Calvin-3 John Calvin was not only one of the church’s greatest trailblazers; he was also one of the virtual church’s leading pioneers. In fact, John Calvin was all about virtual churches. Even though Calvin lived almost a half-millennium before the first virtual church was born, were he alive today he would be a fan—though he also would be unsatisfied with the direction that most virtual churches are taking.

Calvin was a pre-Enlightenment Christian, meaning that he was born before the modern ideal became the mindset in the Western world. As such, he held many non-modern viewpoints about the church. Let’s look at two examples.

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False Dichotomies in Mission pt. 2 of 2 by Christopher J.H. Wright

ZA Blog on 9 years ago. Tagged under ,.

(See part 1 for the complete context of this post, and for False Dichotomies #1-2.)

Question: In what way have we as evangelical Christians failed to grasp or live out the fullness of God’s missional intent? How (if at all) has our theology of evangelism been weak?

Wright-christopher Answer: First of all, I agree with what Esme Bowers said about how the terrible evil of apartheid in South Africa was given theological justification, and I want to emphasize that theology, therefore, is not just playing mind games. Theology has practical effects, because what people believe determines how they act. Bad theology has bad results – and can cost lives, millions of lives. Weak theology weakens our mission.

I do not want to be only negative, or to stigmatize our whole evangelical movement, but I was asked the question, and here is an honest answer! I think that as evangelicals we have tended to make some false dichotomies, or to separate things that ought to be kept together (because the Bible holds them together), and then to give one priority over the other. And this unbiblical separation has had some regrettable bad results.

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False Dichotomies in Mission pt. 1 of 2 by Christopher J.H. Wright

ZA Blog on 9 years ago. Tagged under ,.

Wright-christopher In June, the Lausanne Biennial Leadership Meeting took place, with about 200 leaders of the Lausanne Movement from around the world meeting in Seoul, Korea. Most of the work was to do with planning for Lausanne III, Cape Town 2010 (http://www.lausanne.org/cape-town-2010)

At one panel discussion that I participated in (as Chair of the Lausanne Theology Working Group), I was asked a question about evangelicals and mission, and whether our theology of evangelism had weaknesses. Here is the question, and the response I made to it. (I should add that I had warning of the question some days before, in case it might appear that I am capable of such instant analysis on the spot!). I would be interested to know if others share these concerns.

Question: In what way have we as evangelical Christians failed to grasp or live out the fullness of God’s missional intent? How (if at all) has our theology of evangelism been weak?

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John Calvin: His legacy in commentaries, not just the institutes by Mark L. Strauss

ZA Blog on 9 years ago. Tagged under ,.

StraussM As the 500th birthday of John Calvin approaches (July 10th), theologians around the world will be reflecting on and celebrating this man’s remarkable legacy. Calvin is perhaps best known for his Institutes of the Christian Religion, his magnum opus on Reformed Theology. Yet Calvin also wrote commentaries on almost every book in the Bible. For me, at least, these may be his most lasting legacy. Calvin embodied through his life, ministry and scholarship the spirit of sola scriptura.

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New Testament Manuscripts: The Beat Goes On by Daniel B. Wallace

ZA Blog on 9 years ago.

For the past twelve months, I’ve been on sabbatical from my teaching duties at Dallas Seminary. The sabbatical officially comes to an end on June 30, but the work goes on. We photographed about 80,000 pages of text, went to ten different countries, and discovered almost forty manuscripts. We have been granted permission to post several of these manuscripts on line. Some recent postings at the CSNTM website (www.csntm.org) are as follows:

36 MSS from Athens have been uploaded to the web site in the past several weeks. The uploads include 30 MSS from the Benaki Museum and six from the National Historical Museum; 17 are continuous-text manuscripts and 19 are lectionaries for a total of nearly 14,000 images. They cover a range in date from the 8th century to the 18th and include five palimpsests. More will…

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Influential Books and Authors: Christopher J.H. Wright on Chambers, Hercus and more

ZA Blog on 9 years ago.

Each week in Influential Books and Authors we hear from a noted scholar on the author(s) and book(s) that have been most important to them for spiritual and intellectual growth. This week we feature Old Testament scholar, Christopher J.H. Wright.

Dr. Chris Wright is International Director of the Langham Partnership International. He also serves as chair of the Lausanne Committee’s Theology Working Group and chair of the Theological Resource Panel of TEAR Fund, a leading Christian relief and development charity. He has written several books, including Living as the People of God (An Eye for an Eye in the US), God’s People in God’s Land, Knowing Jesus through the Old Testament, Walking in the Ways of the Lord, Deuteronomy in the New International Biblical Commentary, The Message of Ezekiel in the Bible Speaks Today series, The God I Don't…

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Influential Books and Authors: Darrell L. Bock on Sanders, Pentecost and reading history

ZA Blog on 9 years ago.

Each week in Influential Books and Authors we hear from a noted scholar on the author(s) and book(s) that have been most important to them for spiritual and intellectual growth. This week we feature New Testament scholar, Darrell L. Bock.

Darrell L. Bock (PhD, University of Aberdeen) is professor of New Testament at Dallas Theological Seminary. He is the author of numerous books and articles including Luke in the NIV Application Commentary series.

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Influential Books and Authors: Mark L. Strauss on Gordon Fee and Douglas Stuart

ZA Blog on 9 years ago.

Each week in Influential Books and Authors we hear from a noted scholar on the author(s) and book(s) that have been most important to them for spiritual and intellectual growth. This week we feature New Testament scholar, Mark L. Strauss.

Mark Strauss (PhD, Aberdeen) is professor of New Testament at Bethel Seminary in San Diego. He has written: The Davidic Messiah in Luke-Acts; Distorting Scripture?; The Challenge of Bible Translation and Gender Accuracy; Four Gospels, One Jesus; and Luke in the Zondervan Illustrated Bible Background Commentary series. Forthcoming books include Mark in the revised Expositor's Bible Commentary series, and Mark in the Zondervan Exegetical Commentary series.

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Gideon’s Fleece by Daniel I. Block

John Walton on 9 years ago. Tagged under .

Bible-BackgroundsPractices that appear in the Bible may at times seem very strange to us. When we encounter them we may at times supply our own intuition to what they mean as we seek to interpret the passage. In a case such as Gideon’s use of a fleece, we may even infer that since his strategy was successful, that it can stand as an approved procedure today. Before we draw such conclusions, it would be wise to examine the ancient world to see if we can understand more about this procedure. Daniel Block offers these thoughts in his Judges contribution to ZIBBCOT.

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Influential Books and Authors: Tremper Longman III discusses Cornelius Van Til

ZA Blog on 9 years ago.

Each week in Influential Books and Authors we hear from a noted scholar on the author(s) and book(s) that have been most important to them for spiritual and intellectual growth. This week we feature Dr. Tremper Longman III.

Tremper Longman III (PhD, Yale University) is the Robert H. Gundry Professor of Biblical Studies and the chair of the religious studies department at Westmont College in Santa Barbara, California where he lives with his wife, Alice. He is the Old Testament editor for the revised Expositor's Bible Commentary and has authored numerous articles and books on the Old Testament and other Bible Studies.

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