eBook Sale: NIV Application Commentaries Just $4.99

ZA Blog on 8 months ago. Tagged under ,.

Each eBook in the NIV Application Commentary series is just $4.99 for a limited time! These eBooks will help you understand the Bible’s ancient message and how it speaks today. See the Deals

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These resources feature top-notch scholarship from leading experts, including these classic volumes and more:

Genesis and Job by John H. Walton Romans and 2 Peter, Jude by Douglas J. Moo Galatians and 1 Peter by Scot McKnight Daniel by Tremper Longman III Luke by Darrell L. Bock 1 Corinthians by Craig L. Blomberg Esther by Karen H. Jobes Deuteronomy by Daniel I. Block More

Browse the Deals Now

Commendations

This series promises to become an indispensable tool for every pastor and teacher who seeks to make the Bible’s timeless…

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Statement from Zondervan Academic

ZA Blog on 8 months ago.

November 4, 2016

In the summer of 2016 Zondervan Academic became aware of emerging concerns that one of its authors, Dr. Peter T. O’Brien, may not have followed commonly accepted standards for the use and documentation of secondary resources in Bible commentaries he had written. Consequently, we began a careful review of Dr. O’Brien’s commentary on Colossians and Philemon, volume 44 in the Word Biblical Commentary (WBC).

It is with sadness and regret that we have concluded this volume does not follow commonly accepted standards for the use and documentation of secondary resources. Dr. O’Brien is revered by his colleagues in the academy and by his former students. His commentaries, including volume 44 in the WBC, have been used with great benefit by the thousands who have purchased them. While we have no reason to believe that Dr. O’Brien intentionally…

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Paul’s Letters — A Commentary eBook Sale

ZA Blog on 9 months ago. Tagged under ,.

For a short time, save up to 80% when you buy eBook editions of commentaries on Paul’s letters.

This new commentary sale features 24 eBooks on the Pauline epistles. These works will help you enhance your teaching and preaching and strengthen your personal devotions.

See the Deals

This is the largest eBook sale on Paul’s letters we’ve ever hosted. You’ll find deals from several series:

NIV Application Commentary (NIVAC) – Understand the Bible’s ancient message and see how it speaks powerfully today. This series features classic works by Doug Moo, Scot McKnight, Craig Blomberg, and many others. Zondervan Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament (ZECNT) – This newer series is designed especially for the pastor and Bible teacher, or students with some knowledge of biblical Greek. The aim is not to review and offer a critique of every possible…

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Who was Paul? His early life, and why it matters

ZA Blog on 9 months ago. Tagged under ,,,.

who-was-paul

When you think of Paul, what comes to mind?

For as much as Paul wrote, and as influential as he was, there is still much we don’t know about Paul.

Paul describes his own life in Philippians 3:5–6, where he lists seven things ascribed to him or achieved by him:

He states that he was “circumcised on the eighth day.” He calls himself “of the people of Israel.” He says he is “of the tribe of Benjamin.” He tells his readers that he is “a Hebrew of Hebrews.” When he thinks of his life relative to the law, he calls himself “a Pharisee.” When he speaks of his zeal, he talks of “persecuting the church.” Lastly, he says that with respect to the…

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eBook SALE! Gospel Commentaries, Plus a New Collection on Matthew

ZA Blog on 11 months ago. Tagged under ,,,,,,.

For a short time, save up to 80% when you buy eBook editions of gospel commentaries.

This new commentary sale features 17 eBooks on Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John. These titles will help you improve your research, enhance your teaching and preaching, and strengthen your personal devotions.

See the Deals

 

NEW BOOK

matthewcollectionThere’s a new title in this sale: The Matthew Commentary Collection. Gathering 3 commentaries on Matthew in 1 volume, this collection is an experiment in crafting new tools for commentary readers. If it’s popular with students of Matthew, we may create Commentary Collections for other books of the Bible.

 

MULTIPLE SERIES

This is the biggest gospel eBooks sale we’ve ever hosted, so you’ll find volumes from several series. Here’s a quick summary of the…

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Whose Wrath? (Romans 5:9) — Mondays with Mounce 293

Bill Mounce on 1 year ago. Tagged under ,,.

No matter how word-for-word a translation tries to be, there will always be some confusing sentence that requires interpretation. Sometimes, the more word-for-word translations just leave it confusing, but other times even the NASB and ESV (for example) feel the need to interpret.

Rom 5:9 says, “Much more then, having now been justified by His blood, we shall be saved from the wrath of God through Him” (NASB). The italics show that “of God” is not in the Greek, which reads, σωθησόμεθα δι᾿ αὐτοῦ ἀπὸ τῆς ὀργῆς.

The ESV simply says “the wrath of God” and footnotes 1 Thess 1:10 and 2:16, referencing also Romans 1:18. Cranfield adds the reference to 1 Thess 5:9.

HCSB and KJV simply say, “from wrath.” Others say “God’s wrath” (NIV, NRSV), and the NET adds the footnote, “Grk, “the wrath,” referring to God’s wrath…

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Did the Early Church Practice Infant Baptism or Full Immersion?

ZA Blog on 1 year ago. Tagged under ,,.

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It’s not hard to determine how the early church celebrated baptism.

You can find several accounts in writings from the early church, including Tertullian’s On Baptism and Hippolytus’ Apostolic Tradition. The Didache also helps us understand how baptism functioned in the life of the church.

Let’s take a look.

How baptisms were performed

Here’s how the process worked:

If someone wanted to be baptized, they first underwent a period of instruction and moral examination.  Because baptisms usually took place on Easter Sunday, this period of instruction happened during Lent.

On the Thursday before Easter, the person being baptized began a period of fasting, praying, confessing sin, and attending Scripture readings and instructions. Exorcisms were also performed, in order to banish demons from the person.

Then, early on Sunday morning—the day of…

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How Should Christians Relate to Governing Authorities? Michael Bird Clarifies

Jeremy Bouma on 1 year ago. Tagged under ,,,,.

9780310327189“Origen, who knew Roman brutality all to well, said: ‘I am disturbed by Paul’s saying that the authority of this age and the judgment of the world are ministers of God.’” (Michael Bird, The Story of God  Bible Commentary: Romans, 442)

Two questions:

What does Paul mean that we should “be subject to the governing authorities” (Romans 13:1)? And in what way is it “necessary to submit to the authorities.” (13:5)?

Michael Bird brings clarity in his new Romans commentary (The Story of God Bible Commentary series). He helps us hear and explore the text in it’s original Roman context, while also applying it to our current global one.

Below we explore four…

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Wayne Grudem: “The Bible is enough.”

Wayne Grudem on 1 year ago. Tagged under ,.

Is the Bible enough for knowing what God wants us to believe and what he wants us to do?

The sufficiency of Scripture means that:

it contains all the words of God he intended his people to have in each stage of redemptive history, and it now contains everything we need God to tell us for salvation, for trusting him perfectly, and for obeying him perfectly.

Scripture contains everything we need for salvation.

In 2 Timothy 3:15, Paul says that Scripture is “able to make you wise for salvation through faith in Christ Jesus.”

Paul goes on to write about Scripture containing everything we need to live the Christian life. Paul goes on to…

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Responding to David Hume’s Argument Against Jesus’ Miracles

ZA Blog on 1 year ago. Tagged under ,,,.

miracles_blog_image Understanding Hume’s objections

Perhaps the most well-articulated argument against Jesus’ miracles comes from David Hume, the great eighteenth-century Scottish philosopher.

You’re probably already familiar with it, but in case you need a refresher…

Here is his argument, in a nutshell:

Human experience confirms the certainty of the laws of nature. Since miracles violate the laws of nature, it would take an enormous amount of evidence to confirm any miracle.

How much evidence? An impossibly large amount.

Because such evidence does not exist, belief in miracles is therefore irrational.

Hume supported his primary argument with four supporting claims:

No miracle has been attested by a sufficient number of educated and rational witnesses. There is a human tendency to believe the spectacular. Most reports of miracles occur among ignorant and barbarous people. Claims…

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Michael Bird on the “Gracism” of Romans 3:21–31

Jeremy Bouma on 1 year ago. Tagged under ,,,,,.

9780310327189Aussie Michael Bird observes what many Americans often forget: “Blacks, whites, and Latinos are never more segregated than when it comes to attending worship services.” Sunday at 11:00 a.m. truly is the most segregated hour in America.

What we need is a healthy dose of “gracism.” Bird’s fresh look at Romans 3:21–31 will administer this vital antidote.

He explains the connection between grace and race in his new Romans commentary (SGBC series):

Gracism means that grace is both preached and practiced toward others. Gracism means that the most ruthless and efficient way to destroy our tribal enemies is by making them our brothers and sisters in Christ. (135)

What Bird reveals about Paul’s central passage on justification is a…

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20 Questions You Never Thought to Ask about the Gospels… But Need to

ZA Blog on 1 year ago. Tagged under ,,,.

20 Questions about the Gospels

Have you ever wondered…

1. Why isn’t there just one account of Jesus in the Bible? Why four?

2. Why not more than four? Other gospels were written, such as the famous Gospel of Thomas. Why aren’t they included in the Bible?

3. Who were the Gospels written for? Not just us. We as twenty-first century readers aren’t the only audience. How did the first readers experience the message?

4. Did Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John really write their Gospels? Some scholars say the Gospels were written by others. Why? And…

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