Nobody Talks Like That! (Ps 102:12) – Mondays with Mounce 291

Bill Mounce on 4 months ago. Tagged under ,,,,.

You know you have been talking too much about translation when your spouse throws your own words back in your face. Robin was reading Ps 102:12 the other day. “But you, Lord, sit enthroned forever; your renown endures through all generations” (NIV).

“Renown,” she laughed, what’s renown? And then she quoted my common response: “That’s not English; nobody talks like that.”

Now Robin knows precisely what “renown” means. “The condition of being known or talked about by many people; fame.” But would we use a word like that? Probably not; “fame” would be the normal way of saying it.

But this brings up the interesting issue of active vs passive vocabulary. The average adult has an active vocabulary of 20,000–35,000 (read more

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Doesn’t ἀντί Always Mean “Instead of”? (Heb 12:2) – Mondays with Mounce 289

Bill Mounce on 5 months ago. Tagged under ,,,.

I came across a really strange use of ἀντί the other day. It serves as a good example of semantic range.

Speaking of Jesus, Heb 12:2 says, “For (ἀντί) the joy set before him he endured the cross, scorning its shame, and sat down at the right hand of the throne of God.” The most common meaning of ἀντί, by far, is the idea of replacement. BDAG’s first two definitions are: (1) “indicating that one person or thing is, or is to be, replaced by another, instead of, in place of”; (2) “indicating that one thing is equiv. to another, for, as, in place of.”

This would give a strange interpretation of verse 2.…

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Is the ESV Literal and the NIV Gender Neutral? – Mondays with Mounce 286

Bill Mounce on 6 months ago. Tagged under ,,,,,,.

This blog is purely on translation and not directly on Greek, but I have been thinking about this a lot lately so thought I would share it.

Most people say there are two translation camps, formal equivalent and functional equivalent (or dynamic equivalent). The longer I am in translation work, the more I see how simplistic this division is.

There actually are five methods on translation with three sub-categories for the handling of gender language. Translations are all on a continuum, overlapping one another, and hence it is misleading to picture them as different points on a line. I am guessing, but for example, about eighty percent of the ESV and the

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