[Common Places] Sanctification: Interview

Michael Allen and Scott Swain, editors of Common Places on 2 weeks ago. Tagged under ,,.

Our current series, Sanctification, looks at elements of the forthcoming volume by Michael Allen in the New Studies in Dogmatics series.

sanctification

Your treatment of sanctification is itself a whole dogmatics in miniature. What led you to take this approach?

Two things have been formative here.

First, I’ve been increasingly alert to the way in which Christian moral teaching falls on deaf ears, it seems, not only in our wider culture but even within churches. It seems to me that we not only struggle with what we might call biblical and theological illiteracy, that is, unfamiliarity with the material, but perhaps more subtly with a complete misperception of its meaning. Words like “holy” are assumed to carry mainstream social meaning and, perhaps, Christ is taken to be…

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[Common Places] Sanctification: “This Is to Preach Christ”

Michael Allen on 1 month ago. Tagged under ,,.

Our current series, Sanctification, looks at elements of the forthcoming volume by Michael Allen in the New Studies in Dogmatics series.

sanctificationListening to Augustine

In the year 413, Augustine wrote a small work entitled “On Faith and Works” (De fide et operibus). He responded to some men who “think that it is wrong and even absurd that one should first be taught how to live a Christian life and then be baptized. They think rather that the sacrament of baptism should come first: the teaching concerning morals and the life of a Christian should follow afterwards.”[i]  Augustine suggests that there are three concerns to be addressed. We do well to note how he distinguishes the key issues without in any way dismissing one for the sake of…

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[Common Places] Sanctification: Sanctification Made Strange

Michael Allen on 1 month ago. Tagged under ,,.

Our current series, Sanctification, looks at elements of the forthcoming volume by Michael Allen in the New Studies in Dogmatics series.

sanctification_200 The harder part of theology can oftentimes take the form of bringing into relief that which we are most likely to overlook. We miss things for a variety of reasons. Sometimes we miss things because they are so foreign or odd to us, whether they are literarily odd or culturally exotic. We may even know that they are baffling and, therefore, avoid them altogether. Sometimes we miss things because they seem so straightforward and familiar. We presume that a word in the Bible means just what it might in our ordinary experience, as if the fact that it was written in koine

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Turning the Mind to Doxology – An Excerpt from The Triune God by Fred Sanders

ZA Blog on 7 months ago. Tagged under ,,,.

Today’s excerpt is from The Triune God, the second volume in our New Studies in Dogmatics series. Within, Fred Sanders seeks to retrieve the riches of the classical doctrine of the Trinity for the sake of a contemporary evangelical audience.

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Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the9780310491491_image Holy Ghost! As it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be, world without end.

The glory of God is from everlasting to everlasting, but while the praise of the Trinity will have no end, it had a beginning. There was never a time when God was not glorious as Father, as Son, and as Holy Spirit. But there was a time when that singular glory (singular because, to gloss the Athanasian Creed, there are…

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[Common Places] New Studies in Dogmatics: Kickoff Reception at ETS Today (11/19/15)

ZA Blog on 1 year ago. Tagged under ,,,,.

Karl Barth

Are you at ETS? This very morning, meet some of the team behind the New Studies in Dogmatics series at our coffee reception:

WHEN: November 19 (2015), 10:00 – 11:00 am WHERE: Zondervan Academic’s booth (#14)

Join us to celebrate the launch of the new NSD series. The first volume, now available for you, is Christopher R. J. Holmes’s The Holy Spirit.

Can’t make it to the reception? We’ll miss you. But here are some articles from our Common Places blog series that you will likely enjoy:

Barth’s Pneumatology in Christopher Holmes’ “The Holy Spirit” by Ben Rhodes

The Holy Spirit: An Interview with Christopher R. J. Holmes by Michael Allen and Scott Swain

Why I Wrote “The Holy Spirit” by Christopher R. J. Holmes

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God’s Freedom – An Excerpt from The Holy Spirit

ZA Blog on 1 year ago. Tagged under ,,,,.

The Holy Spirit by Christopher Holmes

Today we continue our study of the third member of the Trinity. In The Holy Spirit, Chris Holmes takes up the questions surrounding the Spirit’s procession and mission with the help of three of the church’s greatest teachers—Augustine, Thomas Aquinas, and Karl Barth. The following excerpt begins to outline Barth’s contribution to pneumatology. This first book in the New Studies in Dogmatics series is now available from Zondervan Academic. Order your copy today.

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Karl Barth is the last major classical interlocutor to feature in our account of the Holy Spirit. As Augustine and Thomas, Barth will not leave us room “for a facile self-dispensation from the burden of metaphysical thought.” This is because of one theological conviction above all else,…

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[Common Places] New Studies in Dogmatics: Barth’s Pneumatology in Christopher Holmes’s The Holy Spirit

Ben Rhodes on 1 year ago. Tagged under ,,,,.

Karl Barth

Zondervan Academic’s New Studies in Dogmatics series launches this fall with its first volume, Christopher Holmes’s The Holy Spirit, which is now available. We will introduce readers to this work and engage with some of the doctrinal issues addressed therein over a series of four posts here at Common Places. In this third post, Ben Rhodes takes a closer look at Part 3: Engaging Barth: The Other-Directed Spirit. (Click here to read the other posts in this series.)

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Christopher Holmes’s writing is an admirable model of patient exegesis, both of Scripture and of the Christian theological tradition. His most recent book, The Holy Spirit, largely consists of careful readings of Augustine, Aquinas, and Barth as they read the Gospel of John (both in…

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The Spirit is Other-Directed – An Excerpt from The Holy Spirit

ZA Blog on 1 year ago. Tagged under ,.

The Holy Spirit by Christopher HolmesOf the three persons of the Trinity, the Holy Spirit is often the most difficult to wrap our minds around. In this book, New Zealand lecturer and Anglican priest Christopher R. J. Holmes lays out what we know about how God reveals himself through the Holy Spirit. The Holy Spirit, the first installment in the New Studies in Dogmatics series, is now available from Zondervan Academic. Order your copy today.

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This is a book about the being, identity, and activity of the Holy Spirit. What is the Holy Spirit? Who is the Holy Spirit? How does the Spirit do things? And what does the Spirit do? These are the central questions. The Spirit’s abiding interest is to bind us to…

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[Common Places] New Studies in Dogmatics: The Holy Spirit—Interview with Christopher R. J. Holmes

Michael Allen and Scott Swain, editors of Common Places on 1 year ago. Tagged under ,,,.

Screen Shot 2015-10-12 at 8.51.12 PMZondervan Academic’s New Studies in Dogmatics series launched this fall with its first volume, Christopher Holmes’s The Holy Spirit, which is now available. We will introduce readers to this work and engage with some of the doctrinal issues addressed therein over a series of four posts here at Common Places. For our second post, we have asked Chris a few questions about his book. (Click here to read the first post in this series.)

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You begin your book by addressing the distinction between theology and economy. What benefit does that distinction offer the student of Holy Scripture? What is it meant to do or to prompt us to remember?

Chris Holmes: The distinction between theology and economy maps nicely onto…

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4 Things You Need to Know About the Holy Spirit’s Being and Nature

Jeremy Bouma on 1 year ago. Tagged under ,,,,,.

The Holy Spirit by Christopher HolmesWhat is the Holy Spirit? Who is the Holy Spirit? How does the Spirit do things? And what does the Spirit do?

Having come from an evangelical tradition that emphasized the Father and the Son at the expense of the Spirit, answers to these questions were mostly AWOL. In fact, it seems such is the case of evangelicalism broadly: a recent survey found 51% say the Holy Spirit isn’t a personal being, but a force. Only 42% affirm the 3rd person of the Trinity is a person.

In The Holy Spirit Christopher Holmes rectifies this confusion by providing concrete answers about the Holy Spirit’s identity, origin, and acts. It is the inaugural volume in the new New Studies in Dogmatics series that…

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[Common Places] New Studies in Dogmatics: The Holy Spirit

Christopher Holmes on 1 year ago. Tagged under ,,,,.

Zondervan Academic’s New Studies in Dogmatics series launches this fall with its first volume, Christopher Holmes’s The Holy Spirit, appearing in print this month. We will introduce readers to this work and engage with some of the doctrinal issues addressed therein over a series of four posts here at Common Places. In this first post, the author speaks to some of the germinal principles that shape his approach to the topic.

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One of the reasons I wrote the book was to think through the matter of origins. Origins is one of the main concerns of Fourth Gospel. Jesus is repeatedly asked, “Where do you come from?” The question of origins is the question of antecedence, specifically the antecedent life of God. I wanted to think through why that life is important to describe in relation…

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[Common Places] New Studies in Dogmatics: The Divine Names

Scott Swain on 2 years ago. Tagged under ,,,,,.

Gentile_da_Fabriano_052

The perfections of the triune God may be treated profitably under various aspects. Under the aspect of “divine attributes,” God’s perfections are studied as truths about God’s being, always alert to the fact that, properly speaking, God does not have attributes since God is his perfect being, power, wisdom, and love. Under the aspect of “divine goods”—Gregory of Nyssa’s lovely description of the divine perfections—God’s perfections are treated with a view to God’s status as the supreme object of desire and delight, in whose presence is fullness of joy and at whose right hand are pleasures evermore. Both of these approaches are common to natural theology and revealed theology insofar as these disciplines treat God as the efficient and final cause of his creatures.

I have chosen, however, to treat God’s perfections under the aspect of The Divine Names. Though…

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