Request an Exam Copy

Common Sense in Translation - Acts 7:18 (Monday with Mounce 132)

Categories Mondays with Mounce
Monday with MounceThere is no substitute for common sense in translation. Sometimes when you read the Greek, it is so obvious that it can’t mean what it says. The question is, what is a translator to do?

Stephen says in his speech, “But as the time of the promise drew near, which God had granted to Abraham, the people increased and multiplied in Egypt until there arose over Egypt another king who did not know Joseph (ὃς οὐκ ᾔδει τὸν Ἰωσήφ)” (Acts 7:17-18, ESV).

Of course he did not know Joseph. Joseph had been dead for centuries.

Some translations of course are willing to leave such a silly notion in the text and expect the reader to figure it out (ESV, NKJV, HCSB). 

But watch the other translations try to spell out the specifics of the abbreviated Greek.“Who knew nothing about Joseph” (NASB, NLT). “To whom Joseph meant nothing” (NIV). “Who had not known Joseph” (NRSV). I do like the NET on this one: “who did not know about Joseph.” The simple “about” makes the implicit clear and understandable.

A simple reminder that all translation involves interpretation, and sometimes a word for word translation leaves us with something nonsensical.

MouncewWilliam D. [Bill] Mounce posts about the Greek language, exegesis, and related topics at  Koinonia. He is the author of numerous books, including the bestselling Basics of Biblical Greek, and is the general editor for Mounce's Complete Expository Dictionary of the Old and New Testament Words. He served as the New Testament chair of the English Standard Version Bible translation, and is currently on the Committee for Bible Translation for the NIVLearn more and visit Bill's other blog on spiritual growth, Life is a Journey, at www.billmounce.com

Extra-Curricular Activities 02/18/12
Extra-Curricular Activities 02/18/12 Craig Keener asks, Are Miracles Real? Tim Gombis on how Jesus Transforms Corrupted Assumptions.  Marc Cortez refle...
Your form could not be submitted. Please check errors and resubmit.

Thank you!
Sign up complete.

Subscribe to the Blog Get expert commentary on biblical languages, fresh explorations in theology, hand-picked book excerpts, author videos, and info on limited-time sales.
By submitting your email address, you understand that you will receive email communications from HarperCollins Christian Publishing (501 Nelson Place, Nashville, TN 37214 USA) providing information about products and services of HCCP and its affiliates. You may unsubscribe from these email communications at any time. If you have any questions, please review our Privacy Policy or email us at yourprivacy@harpercollins.com.
Join the ConversationRequired