When Was Acts Written?

ZA Blog on 8 months ago. Tagged under ,.

When was Acts written

This post is adapted from Darrell Bock’s Theology of Luke and Acts online course.

To determine when Acts was written, we need to evaluate the evidence from both Luke and Acts, because the two books were written together, with Luke appearing slightly before Acts.

At first glance, it seems that the book of Acts was written around the same time of the last events it describes. The story ends; Luke writes the book. That’s the date.

For this reason, many people place Acts in the early 60s, because this coincides with the date of Paul’s imprisonment in Rome.

But why couldn’t Luke have written the book later?

It is possible Luke’s story isn’t really about Paul. Instead, it’s about the gospel arriving at Rome. In this view, it’s not important what Paul does after the gospel makes it to…

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Why Are Jesus’ Genealogies in Matthew and Luke Different?

ZA Blog on 1 year ago. Tagged under ,,,,.

Why are Jesus' genealogies in Matthew and Luke different?

The birth narratives in both Matthew and Luke help answer the question, “Who is Jesus and where did he come from?” One of the ways each book does this is by recounting Jesus’ genealogy.

The problem is: the genealogies are different.

The Old Testament predicted that the Messiah would come from the line of David. Both Matthew and Luke provide genealogies of Jesus that confirm he was a descendent of David—therefore, a legitimate Messiah. He was a legitimate claimant to the throne of Israel.

But they differ in an important way: Matthew follows the line of David’s son Solomon, while Luke follows the line of Nathan, another Son of David. The end result is two distinct genealogies.

How do we account for this?

Some argue that either Matthew or Luke got it wrong. They created or borrowed a genealogy in…

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eBook SALE! Gospel Commentaries, Plus a New Collection on Matthew

ZA Blog on 2 years ago. Tagged under ,,,,,,.

For a short time, save up to 80% when you buy eBook editions of gospel commentaries.

This new commentary sale features 17 eBooks on Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John. These titles will help you improve your research, enhance your teaching and preaching, and strengthen your personal devotions.

See the Deals

 

NEW BOOK

matthewcollectionThere’s a new title in this sale: The Matthew Commentary Collection. Gathering 3 commentaries on Matthew in 1 volume, this collection is an experiment in crafting new tools for commentary readers. If it’s popular with students of Matthew, we may create Commentary Collections for other books of the Bible.

 

MULTIPLE SERIES

This is the biggest gospel eBooks sale we’ve ever hosted, so you’ll find volumes from several series. Here’s a quick summary of the…

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Ellipsis (What Is Missing in Luke 2:49?) – Mondays with Mounce 245

Bill Mounce on 3 years ago. Tagged under ,,,,.

Here is a great example of why translation involves interpretation, and why a “word-for-word” approach can often fail.

When Jesus’ parents finally find Jesus, he responds, “Didn’t you know I had to be (δεῖ εἶναί με) in my Father’s house (ἐν τοῖς τοῦ πατρός μου)? (NIV).

As you can see from the Greek, there is no word for “house,” and yet every modern translation supplies “house.” The KJV is alone in suggesting another interpretation. “I must be about my Father’s business?”

One of the things you will learn as you get further into Greek is how Greek can drop out words; I suspect this is true of any language. Context and a basic knowledge of the language fills in the gaps. For example, as I have said in other blogs, I am from Minnesota and we are famous for ending…

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