Do You Know about These Two Unique Features of John’s Gospel?

Jeremy Bouma on 1 day ago. Tagged under ,,,.

johnzecntIt has been understood that John’s Gospel is a distinct chronicling of the person and work of Jesus of Nazareth. That biblical scholars have cordoned it off from the so-called Synoptic gospels bears witness to this distinction. And if you’ve spent any amount of time with the beloved disciple’s gospel you’ve probably sensed its uniqueness, too.

But do you understand some of the central features that make it distinct? Edward W. Klink III helpfully explains two such characteristics in his new John commentary (ZECNT).

Building on the pioneering work of C. H. Dodd, who “In the twentieth century … provided the most focused analysis” (53), Klink provides readers an extended introduction to two unique features of John in order to help readers interpret it rightly: dialogues and monologues. Of the former…

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Statistics Don’t Lie, but Statisticians Can Mislead (1 John 1:7) – Mondays with Mounce 267

Bill Mounce on 2 days ago. Tagged under ,,,.

I am finishing up a class for BiblicalTraining.org on why I trust the Bible. For the last several weeks I have been immersed in Dan Wallace and Bart Ehrman discussions.

Ehrman’s book Misquoting Jesus has nothing to do with misquoting Jesus but is a popular presentation on the challenges of textual criticism, and who buys a book titled Textual Criticism other than serious students?

One of Ehrman’s more popular statements is that there are more errors in the manuscript tradition than there are words in the Greek Testament. He says there are 400,000 variants and there are 138,213 words in NA28, which could imply that every word is in question. Since he focuses on the only two paragraph length passages that raise the issue of textual criticism, John…

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Turning the Mind to Doxology – An Excerpt from The Triune God by Fred Sanders

ZA Blog on 5 days ago. Tagged under ,,,.

Today’s excerpt is from The Triune God, the second volume in our New Studies in Dogmatics series. Within, Fred Sanders seeks to retrieve the riches of the classical doctrine of the Trinity for the sake of a contemporary evangelical audience.

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Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the9780310491491_image Holy Ghost! As it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be, world without end.

The glory of God is from everlasting to everlasting, but while the praise of the Trinity will have no end, it had a beginning. There was never a time when God was not glorious as Father, as Son, and as Holy Spirit. But there was a time when that singular…

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[Common Places] Pro-Nicene Theology: Theologia and Oikonomia

Lewis Ayres on 6 days ago. Tagged under ,,.

Our current series, Pro-Nicene Theology, offers doctrinal and exegetical entries to the key tenets of basic Trinitarian orthodoxy as developed in the early centuries of the church. For introduction to the series, see this first post.

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The individual terms theologia and oikonomia have long histories of their own in classical Greek, but the first time we find these two terms paired in Christian writing is in the work of the famous theologian and exegete Origen of Alexandria (died c. 254). He speaks in the 18th of his Homilies on Jeremiah of God speaking “theologically about himself, and [not about] his plan (oikonomia) for human matters” (18.6.3). Whereas theologia concerns the nature of God, God’s oikonomia refers to God’s concern for and ordering…

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The 3 Actors of Ephesians—And Why They Matter to the Story of God

Jeremy Bouma on 1 week ago. Tagged under ,,,.

ephesianssgbc“The story of God in Ephesians will change your life if you let it,” exclaims Mark D. Roberts in his new Ephesians commentary. “It will open your eyes to seeing God, your life, the church, and indeed the entire universe in a whole new way” (1)

That’s because this story isn’t only about God. Yes, he’s the primary actor. But there are two other actors that play a commanding role: “me” and “us.”

Like all commentaries in The Story of God Bible Commentary series, Roberts draws the reader into God’s Story  by illuminating and explaining each passage of Scripture in light of its grand narrative—helping us live this letter in our own contexts. He begins his endeavor with a goodly introduction orienting us to this letter, particularly the actors within it.

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Should You Practice Your Sermons? (1 Cor 1:17) – Mondays with Mounce 266

Bill Mounce on 1 week ago. Tagged under ,,,.

Paul tells the Corinthians, “For Christ did not send me to baptize but to preach the gospel, and not with words of eloquent wisdom (οὐκ ἐν σοφίᾳ λόγου), lest the cross of Christ be emptied of its power” (1 Cor 1:17; see the NJB, “wise words”).

The problem with this translation is that it would mean no pastor should speak with eloquence. I guess that means all pastors can speak wisdom but they can’t sound fluent or persuasive. And it means the two days I used to spend practicing my sermons were an unbiblical waste of time.

The NIV (2011) has, “not with wisdom and eloquence,” a poor change from the 1984, “not with words of human wisdom,” which makes…

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Setting the Stage for the Gospel of John – An Excerpt from the Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament

ZA Blog on 1 week ago. Tagged under ,,.

Today’s excerpt is from the gospel of John, the newest installment in the Zondervan Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament.

Written by Edward W. Klink III, this volume treats the literary context and structure of the gospel in the original Greek, and provides an original translation based on the literary structure. 

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9780310243601_imageEXPLANATION OF THE TEXT

The prologue of John is the cornerstone for the entire Gospel, the lens through which the Gospel must be read. It is of great importance that the magnificent language and imagery of the prologue not detract the reader from grasping its functional significance for explaining and directing the rest of the Gospel.

IN DEPTH: The…

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ETS and NA28 – Mondays with Mounce 265

Bill Mounce on 2 weeks ago. Tagged under .

I just came home from the national meeting of the Evangelical Theological Society in San Antonio. The general topic was the Trinity, but for me the highlight was Dr. Daniel Wallace’s presidential address on current issues relating to textual criticism and the work of his ministry, the Center for the Study of New Testament Manuscripts (CSNTM.org). One of the things I learned is how active women were as scribes, a fact rarely discussed.

I also met with a ministry that is working on a Greek text of the New Testament that more accurately reflects manuscript evidence in terms of spellings.

Did you know that our current Greek texts standardize spellings?

Westcott and Hort worked to show the variation of spellings evidenced in the manuscripts, especially when you can see different tendencies in different authors. So for example, “David” can…

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Two Views, Four Voices on Homosexuality, the Bible, and the Church

Jeremy Bouma on 2 weeks ago. Tagged under ,,,,.

homosexualityThe sanctity of same-sex relations is one of the most pressing ethical questions facing the church today. (9)

So contends Preston Sprinkle in his new edited volume Two Views of Homosexuality, the Bible, and the Church. And rightly so. For, as he continues, “Unlike other topics that Christians debate—the rapture, the millennium, speaking in tongues, etc.—homosexuality affects the very core of human persons.” (9)

Bringing together four voices to discuss two dominant views on the Bible and sexuality, this unique volume in the Counterpoints series offers fresh perspective on a well-worn topic in three distinct ways:

This first-of-its-kind book published by an evangelical publisher encourages dialogue within the body of Christ about homosexuality, the Bible, and the church Though most discussions have been dominated…

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How You Can Preach the Purpose and Theology of the Book of Daniel

Jeremy Bouma on 2 weeks ago. Tagged under ,,,.

danielsgbcWith so much global uncertainty and unease, it’s easy to forget what the book of Daniel reminds us: God is the King of kings!

Old Testament scholar Wendy L. Widder explores this crucial anthem in her new Daniel commentary (Story of God Bible Commentary series). While Christians have been obsessed with how Daniel reveals end-times events, she argues we’ve often missed its pivotal message—one we need now more than ever:

God is in control, no matter how things look, and his kingdom will one day fill the earth. (14)

Widder explains that this message grows out of the book’s primary theme: the kingdom of God. “The book reveals why God is the king of all kings, and it offers perspective on how citizens of his kingdom should live while they…

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