A Primer on the Legacy of Preaching: Volume Two (Enlightenment to the Present Day)

Jeremy Bouma on 2 weeks ago. Tagged under ,.

Legacy of Preaching

9780310538264What do Charles Spurgeon and Charles Finney, D. L. Moody and D. Martyn Lloyd-Jones, Billy Graham and Martin Luther King Jr. all have in common?

They embody the rich legacy of preaching through the ages, inspired by the central ministry component of Jesus Christ, whose very purpose and mission on earth was to preach. As Jesus himself made clear in Luke 4:43:44: “‘I must proclaim the good news of the kingdom of God to the other towns also, because that is why I was sent.’ And he kept on preaching . . .

Now that legacy is collected into two new volumes that are perfect for students, preachers, and interested Christians alike who want to learn from and carry forward that legacy.

A Legacy of Preaching: Volume Two explores the history…

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A Primer on the Legacy of Preaching: Volume One (Apostles to the Revivalists)

Jeremy Bouma on 1 month ago. Tagged under ,.

Legacy of Preaching Volume One

9780310538226What do Augustine and Francis of Assisi, Martin Luther and Matthew Henry, John Bunyan and Johnathan Edwards all have in common?

They embody the rich legacy of preaching through the ages, inspired by the central ministry component of Jesus Christ himself whose very purpose and mission on earth was to preach. As Jesus himself made clear in Luke 4:43:44: “‘I must proclaim the good news of the kingdom of God to the other towns also, because that is why I was sent.’ And he kept on preaching…”

Now that legacy is collected into two new volumes that are perfect for students, preachers, and interested Christians alike who want to learn from and carry forward that legacy.

A…

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New! 5 Online Courses Open for Enrollment Starting Today

ZA Blog on 2 years ago. Tagged under ,,,,,.

5-new-online-courses-small

Today we’re announcing five new online courses, covering a variety of subjects, and taught by first-rate scholars.

Whether you want to learn more about the life of Paul for a Bible study, improve your preaching, or understand the most difficult moral dilemmas of our time, these course are the perfect place to start.

To celebrate, all new courses are $20 off! Take advantage of this introductory pricing to jump-start your learning.

Thinking Through Paul: A Survey of His Life, Letters, and Theology

Thinking Through Paul: A Survey of His Life, Letters, and Theology

taught by Todd Still and Bruce W. Longenecker

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Ask These 5 Questions to Bring Clarity to Your Old Testament Sermons

Jeremy Bouma on 2 years ago. Tagged under ,,,.

9780310524649I wish I’d had Christopher Wright’s new book How to Preach Through the Old Testament for All Its Worth when I regularly preached. It would have helped me preach the text, yes. But it would have helped me preach it in a way my congregation would have understood it.

Because let’s face it, preaching the Old Testament can be…challenging! Wright sympathizes:

to be honest, the Old Testament is a difficult set of books…trying to preach a sermon or teach a Sunday school class from the Old Testament is too exhausting for the pastor or Bible study leader and too confusing for the people. It’s much easier to stick with what we know—the New Testament. (17)

Which is why Wright offers a five-question roadmap for preaching and teaching Old Testament…

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Mounce Archive 11 — How Do You Properly Use Greek in the Pulpit?

Bill Mounce on 3 years ago. Tagged under ,,.

Everyone needs a break once in a while, and Bill Mounce is taking one from his weekly column on biblical Greek until September. Meanwhile, we’ve hand-picked some classic, popular posts from the “Mondays with Mounce” archive for your summer reading and Greek-studying pleasure.

Today’s “classic” asks a question I often asked when I was actively preaching: How do you use Greek (and Hebrew) properly?

Mounce’s wisdom and advice applies to seasoned pastor and seminary student alike, because as he suggests it all begins with homework, whether inside or outside seminary: “If you aren’t doing your homework in Greek, or if you don’t have some facility in Greek,” important discussions of grammar and clausal relationships are “almost meaningless.”

But then he get’s practical, recalling someone who asked “Can I not trust my Bible?” after he corrected an English version: “Ouch! So…

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Multisensory Preaching and Teaching: 4
“Simply Entertainment?” by Rick Blackwood

ZA Blog on 9 years ago. Tagged under .

In today's post I'll address the third question raised when considering multisensory preaching and teaching, "Is it simply entertainment?" But first some background:

Some fundamentalists view the pulpit itself as a doctrinal issue. Any form of teaching that replaces the pulpit as a means of communicating the Word is seen as compromising and as theological error. One well-known advocate of lecture only preaching complains that, "Instead of a pulpit, the focus is a stage."1 The suggestion seems to be that only pulpit teaching is pure, and any other method of teaching is deemed to be "entertainment."

The same well-known advocate of "lecture only" communication writes: "There seems almost no limit to what modern church leaders will do to entice people who aren’t interested in worship and preaching. Too many have bought the notion that the church must win the people by offering them alternative entertainment…"2

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Multisensory Preaching and Teaching: 3
“Does it Water Down the Gospel?” by Rick Blackwood

ZA Blog on 9 years ago. Tagged under .

When I was working on my Doctor of Education at Southern Seminary, I was working out in the gym one afternoon, and I struck up a conversation with a Doctor of Ministry student about my dissertation on multisensory preaching. When I told him what that was, he immediately assumed that I was of the emergent church culture. His comment to me was, "So, I guess you water down the gospel with all the cool visuals." It was a slam against the use of any form of preaching other than lecture preaching. This student even felt that preaching had to be from a pulpit, as if Jesus ever used one of those.

At any rate, it made me aware of how much misunderstanding there really is swirling around multisensory preaching. So let’s take on the second of our three questions: Does multisensory preaching water down the gospel?

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Multisensory Preaching and Teaching: 2
“Do we have permission?” By Rick Blackwood

ZA Blog on 9 years ago. Tagged under .

Yesterday I introduced a heated debate in evangelical churches about the use of multisensory preaching. Some feel that the use of multisensory preaching compromises the purity of biblical preaching and that it is basically a form of theological liberalism. As I said before, in this brief series I want simply to be biblically sensible. Today I will address the first of three questions that have been raised about multisensory preaching. It has to do with permission. Does the Bible forbid the use of multisensory teaching?

For me, if the Bible prohibits multisensory communication, it must be abandoned at once. If the use of visuals, props, media, drama, and other multisensory teaching aids somehow violate a biblical command or principle, I will be the first to reject it. On the other hand, if there is no such prohibition, and if there is actually biblical precedence for this model of communication, then let us embrace it fully.

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Multisensory Preaching and Teaching: 1
Introducing the Controversy by Rick Blackwood

ZA Blog on 9 years ago. Tagged under .

  Blackwoodr  Rick Blackwood is the pastor of Christ Fellowship Church in Miami Florida, a multicultural congregation that boasts more than 70 nationalities. This week he'll discuss The Power of Multisensory Preaching and Teaching in a 4-part series. — Andrew

A new methodology of preaching delivery is sweeping Christianity in America. It is called multisensory, because it interfaces with multiple senses. Unlike conventional lecture preaching, which stimulates only the sense of hearing, multisensory communication stimulates multiple senses, i.e. the senses of hearing, seeing, touching, and sometimes even smell and taste.

Simply put, the multisensory teacher recognizes the senses as information receptors. In other words, the senses act as antennas, which receive information, and then transmit that information to the brain for processing, learning, and action. With that neurological fact in mind, the multisensory teacher aims his teaching at as many of those receptors as possible; knowing the more senses he stimulates in the teaching, the higher the levels of learning in the audience.

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