Advice on studying Romans from Douglas Moo

ZA Blog on 2 weeks ago. Tagged under ,.

We recently sat down with Douglas Moo to talk about some challenges students face when studying Romans. Take a look at what he says.

And be sure to check out his new online course, The Book of Romans: History, Meaning, and Application.

I’ve talked to Christians over the years who say, “Oh, I’m not ready to study Romans yet, that’s too heavy for me.”

You’ve probably heard it taught maybe from the pulpit, maybe you’ve taken a Sunday school class on it. You’ve read it. You’ve studied it perhaps even in Bible study.

Romans is a book that addresses many of those fundamental worldview issues. What does it mean to be a Christian? What is the Gospel of Jesus Christ? How is it relevant to me and to my church?

I think some of the reasons we therefore…

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There Is Always a Reason (John 2:1) – Mondays with Mounce 287

Bill Mounce on 2 weeks ago. Tagged under .

We just completed another week of work on the NIV in Cambridge, and I was again reminded that there is always a reason. No matter how unusual a translation of a certain verse may appear, there is always a reason. Like Jason Bourne, nothing is random.

A good example is John 2:1 in the NLT. “The next day (τῇ ἡμέρᾳ τῇ τρίτῃ) there was a wedding celebration in the village of Cana in Galilee.” Someone might respond, how would you ever get “next” from τρίτῃ? But before you pronounce the NLT translators as incompetent — which they are not — repeat after me: “There…

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5 Things You Need to Know About Katie Luther

Jeremy Bouma on 2 weeks ago. Tagged under ,,,,.

9780310532156They say behind every great man is a great woman.

The same holds true for Martin Luther. And Ruth Tucker wants to introduce her to you in her new book, Katie Luther, First Lady of the Reformation. In it, she shows how, save for Martin Luther himself, Katharina von Bora was one of the most indispensable figures of the German Reformation:

Take her and their twenty-year marriage out of the picture, and his leadership would have suffered severely. Had it not been for the stability she brought to his life, [Martin] may have gone off the rails emotionally and mentally by the mid-1520s…Only Katharina von Bora—no other woman—could have accomplished what she did with this most unstable man. (11–12)

So who was this great woman behind the great Martin Luther? Here are five…

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What is justification?

ZA Blog on 2 weeks ago. Tagged under ,,.

In Romans 1:17, Paul writes: “For in the gospel the righteousness of God is revealed—a righteousness that is by faith from first to last, just as it is written: ‘The righteous will live by faith.’”

This does not refer, in so many words, to “justification by faith.” However, the idea is clearly expressed: God’s righteousness is “by faith from first to last.” It is the one who is “righteous by faith” who will gain spiritual life.

What does this mean? Douglas Moo explains:

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[Common Places] Sanctification: “This Is to Preach Christ”

Michael Allen on 4 weeks ago. Tagged under ,,.

Our current series, Sanctification, looks at elements of the forthcoming volume by Michael Allen in the New Studies in Dogmatics series.

sanctificationListening to Augustine

In the year 413, Augustine wrote a small work entitled “On Faith and Works” (De fide et operibus). He responded to some men who “think that it is wrong and even absurd that one should first be taught how to live a Christian life and then be baptized. They think rather that the sacrament of baptism should come first: the teaching concerning morals and the life of a Christian should follow afterwards.”[i]  Augustine suggests that there are three concerns to be addressed. We do well to note how he distinguishes the key issues without in any way dismissing one for the sake of…

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Eagerly Do Good, Readily Represent: Finding Your Story in 1 Peter 3:13–17

Jeremy Bouma on 1 month ago. Tagged under ,,,.

9780310327301How should Christians live in a culture that’s either outright hostile or increasingly opposed to our faith?

That’s the question Peter addresses in part in his first letter to the churches of Asia Minor. Dennis Edwards explores this same question in his new 1 Peter commentary (Story of God Bible Commentary). In his exposition of 1 Peter 3:13–17, Edwards offers this guidance:

[W]e Christians need to be eager to be agents for good, and to be prepared at all times to represent Jesus with respect toward others. If we do so, at least some of our accusers will be brought up short by the voice of their conscience. (149)

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Is the ESV Literal and the NIV Gender Neutral? – Mondays with Mounce 286

Bill Mounce on 1 month ago. Tagged under ,,,,,,.

This blog is purely on translation and not directly on Greek, but I have been thinking about this a lot lately so thought I would share it.

Most people say there are two translation camps, formal equivalent and functional equivalent (or dynamic equivalent). The longer I am in translation work, the more I see how simplistic this division is.

There actually are five methods on translation with three sub-categories for the handling of gender language. Translations are all on a continuum, overlapping one another, and hence it is misleading to picture them as different points on a line. I am guessing, but for example, about eighty percent of the ESV and the

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You Can Love Him or Hate Him, but You Can’t Ignore Him: Augustine on Grace–An Excerpt from Grace Alone

ZA Blog on 1 month ago. Tagged under ,,,,.

“Grace is the heart of the Christian gospel. It is a doctrine that touches the very depths of human existence.” (19)

In today’s excerpt from Grace Alone–Salvation as a Gift of God, Carl Trueman, professor of Historical Theology and Church History at Westminster Theological Seminary, reveals the importance of Augustine’s thinking as a foundation for the church’s understanding of this magnificent gift.

9780310515760Grace Narrated: Augustine’s Confessions

The history of theology is essentially a story. How one tells that story, which characters and places and actions receive prominence, will vary from historian to historian. But when we look at the “history of grace,” an undisputed key figure in that history is Augustine, fifth-century bishop of Hippo Regius in North Africa. Augustine’s life and writings profoundly shaped all later debates about grace.…

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How Does the Holy Spirit Operate in the Believer’s Life?

Jeremy Bouma on 1 month ago. Tagged under ,,,,,.

rediscoveringholyspirit“On no other point, in my view, is the Spirit’s work more misunderstood than with regard to the manner of his operation in the life of believers” (244).

Which is why Michael Horton offers an entire chapter on “How the Spirit Gives” in his new book Rediscovering the Holy Spirit.

I’m glad he does. Because as a former pastor I’ve found Horton’s view to be true: people struggle to understand how the Spirit ordinarily operates in their life. After explaining the relationship between the Spirit and the means of grace, Horton helps us understand how the Spirit gives by getting specific:

Hearing Christ preached, being baptized, and taking Communion are not substitutes for faith but are the means through which the Spirit gives us faith and confirms our faith to the…

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When οὔν Doesn’t Mean “Therefore” (John 11:6) – Mondays with Mounce 285

Bill Mounce on 1 month ago. Tagged under ,,.

One of the better known conundrums in NT exegesis is Jesus’ response to hearing about Lazarus. “Now Jesus loved (ἠγάπα) Martha and her sister and Lazarus. So (οὖν) when he heard that Lazarus was sick, he stayed where he was two more days.” Jesus loved them, and “therefore” stayed longer (i.e., so Lazarus would die).

Some kind of love, or is it?

I find the NLT’s solution the least acceptable. “So although Jesus loved Martha, Mary, and Lazarus, he stayed…” It is impossible to get the concessive “although” out of the Greek (ἠγάπα). The NLT is moving out of translation into commentary.

A better solution is to spend some time in…

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[Common Places] Sanctification: Sanctification Made Strange

Michael Allen on 1 month ago. Tagged under ,,.

Our current series, Sanctification, looks at elements of the forthcoming volume by Michael Allen in the New Studies in Dogmatics series.

sanctification_200 The harder part of theology can oftentimes take the form of bringing into relief that which we are most likely to overlook. We miss things for a variety of reasons. Sometimes we miss things because they are so foreign or odd to us, whether they are literarily odd or culturally exotic. We may even know that they are baffling and, therefore, avoid them altogether. Sometimes we miss things because they seem so straightforward and familiar. We presume that a word in the Bible means just what it might in our ordinary experience, as if the fact that it was written in koine

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Software Sale: 50% Off Expositor’s Bible Commentary, Original and Revised Editions

ZA Blog on 1 month ago. Tagged under ,,.

ebc-original-and-revised-060517-800px

Right now, both the original Expositor’s Bible Commentary (12 volumes) and the Revised Edition of EBC (13 volumes) are 50% off at Olive Tree Bible software. These deals will disappear on June 20, 2017.

The Expositor’s Bible Commentary series set the gold standard for expositors—for understanding the biblical authors and teaching their message today.

But which of the these series is best for you? Olive Tree published a helpful blog post about their similarities and differences.

Here’s more context:

From the original series

Written primarily by expositors for expositors, [this series] aims to provide preachers, teachers, and students of the Bible with a new and comprehensive commentary on the books of the Old and New Testaments. Its stance is that of a scholarly evangelicalism committed to the divine inspiration, complete trustworthiness, and full authority of the Bible. Its…

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