Is There an Evangelical Bias in Translation (Mark 5:23) – Mondays with Mounce 303

Bill Mounce on 4 days ago. Tagged under ,,.

Sometimes we translators are accused of having an evangelical bias, of altering the translation of a passage to make the New Testament not contradict itself, or artificially conforming a New Testament citation to its Old Testament source.

It is an interesting charge, and is somewhat based on the assumption that the New Testament contradicts itself or that the New Testament authors were not able to quote their Old Testament accurately.

Mark 5:23 provides a good example of the former. This is the famous crux when it comes to inerrancy. Was Jarius’ daughter dead, or almost dead, when her father was speaking with Jesus?

The NASB translates, “My little daughter is at the point of death” (also ESV, NRSV); the NET has, “My…

Read more

Translating the Word but Missing the Context (Mark 5:4) – Mondays with Mounce 302

Bill Mounce on 1 week ago. Tagged under ,,.

Mark 5:4 has an interesting construction with διά, and provides an example of why we need to watch the larger context when translating. Verses 3–4 are as follows.

“This man lived in the tombs, and no one could bind him anymore, not even with a chain. For he had often been chained hand and foot (διὰ τὸ αὐτὸν πολλάκις πέδαις καὶ ἁλύσεσιν δεδέσθαι), but he tore the chains apart and broke the irons on his feet (καὶ διεσπάσθαι ὑπ᾿ αὐτοῦ τὰς ἁλύσεις καὶ τὰς πέδας συντετρῖφθαι). No one was strong enough to subdue him” (NIV).

Notice that διὰ goes with three accusatives, each with its own infinitive.

αὐτὸν … δεδέσθαι διεσπάσθαι … ἁλύσεις…

Read more

Does Sanctification Have Any Place in the Economy of the Gospel?

Jeremy Bouma on 2 weeks ago. Tagged under ,,,.

9780310491460While the Protestant Church is coming off from a week celebrating the Reformation rallying cry “justification by grace through faith,” we need to ask what about sanctification? Does holiness have a place in the economy of the gospel when salvation is said to be from Christ alone, by grace alone, through faith alone?

Michael Allen unequivocally affirms holiness’ place in the gospel with his new book Sanctification.

The economy of the gospel demands that we confess not only that Christ brings life, blessing, and, fundamentally, God to us, but that in so doing he brings holiness along the way. (22)

The third book in the new New Studies in Dogmatics series, Allen’s book defines holiness by tending to its connections with the character of God, the…

Read more

When καί Is a Comma, and Deceptive Marketing (Mark 3:16–19) – Mondays with Mounce 301

Bill Mounce on 2 weeks ago. Tagged under ,,.

One of the differences between Greek and English style is in expressing a series. When English translations mimic Greek style, they are writing poor English style, or miscommunicating altogether.

Greek tends to say conjunction + item + conjunction + item + conjunction + final item. English says item + comma + item + comma (if you use the Oxford comma) + conjunction + final item. Take, for example, the listing of the 12 apostles. The NASB goes very much word for word.

“And [καί] He appointed the twelve: [καί] Simon (to whom He gave the name Peter), and [καί] James, the son of Zebedee, and [καί] John the brother of James ( [καί] to them He gave the name Boanerges, which means, “Sons of Thunder”); and [καί] Andrew, and [καί] Philip,…

Read more

NIV Application Commentary Sale: $4.99 eBooks for a Short Time

ZA Blog on 2 weeks ago. Tagged under ,.

NIVAC-EBOOKS-4-emailbanner3

Save up to 83% on NIV Application Commentary eBooks right now: See the deals.

About NIV Application commentaries

nivac-romans-coverSome Bible commentaries take you on a one-way trip to the world of the Bible, and then leave you there…putting the work of applying those lessons completely on you.

NIV Application Commentaries are different because they help you complete the interpretive task. You will understand the Bible’s ancient message, but you will also see how that message speaks with authority and power, today, in your own context.

You’ll grow in your teaching, preaching, study, and personal Bible reading—because the NIV Application Commentaries help you get the full job done.

Sale…

Read more

Should Your Church Go Multisite? Is it Biblical?

ZA Blog on 2 weeks ago. Tagged under ,,.

It seems everybody is doing it these days, but is this the right solution for your congregation?

In today’s excerpt from MultiChurch, authors Brad House and Gregg Allison explain that multisite is not only a biblically sound ecclesiological model, but also a model that provides a compelling solution to contemporary reductionism in the church.

***

9780310530534Multichurch—and the broader multisite movement for that matter—is nothing new. While it may seem like a recent phenomenon—something fresh, unique, and unprecedented—it’s actually the latest variation on a very old way of doing church. Every generation is prone to what C. S. Lewis referred to as “chronological snobbery,” the assumption that our time and our contributions are uniquely the best or the most advanced. The…

Read more

3 Reasons Why Catholics and Protestants Interpret Scripture Differently

Jeremy Bouma on 3 weeks ago. Tagged under ,,,.

9780310530718While Protestants are celebrating the 500th anniversary of the Reformation, Catholic professor Matthew Levering is asking a basic-level question:

Was the Reformation a mistake?

In his similarly titled book, Levering makes it clear he believes “they were right in seeking reform” (31). Yet he does “consider that the Reformers made some doctrinal mistakes” (15), and addresses nine of them. Over the past few weeks we’ve engaged a few of his arguments here and here.

Concluding the book, Kevin Vanhoozer offers a “Mere Protestant Response.” He evaluates Levering’s theological method in establishing Catholic doctrine as biblical, showing why Protestants and Catholics interpret Scripture differently.

Here are three important differences highlighted by Vanhoozer.

1) The Locus of Authority

The main interpretive difference between Protestants and…

Read more

We All Hear Words Differently (Gal 2:10) – Mondays with Mounce 300

ZA Blog on 3 weeks ago.

The longer I translate, the more I realize how subtle language is, and how different people hear the same word or phrase differently.

In Galatians 2, Paul is talking about his relationship with the Jerusalem church and their agreement with his theology. His conclusion is in v 10. “All they asked was that we should continue to remember (μνημονεύωμεν) the poor, the very thing I had been eager (ἐσπούδασα) to do all along” (NIV).

μνημονεύωμεν is a present subjunctive, which the NIV makes explicit with the “continue.” The NLT has, “keep on helping the poor.” Other translations have the simple, “They asked only that we would…

Read more

95 eBooks Sale: 95 Key Books on the Reformation, Reformed Theology, & More

ZA Blog on 3 weeks ago. Tagged under ,,.

za-blog-banner-95-ebooks-sale

We’re excited to share with you the 95 eBooks Sale, recognizing the 500th anniversary of the Reformation and Martin Luther’s 95 Theses.

This is the biggest eBook sale we’ve ever hosted! You can save up to 81% on these deals, starting at $1.99.

The sale ends November 5, 2017 (11:59pm ET), and it features:

Key books across several topics: Reformation studies Reformed theology Biblical studies and study Bibles from Reformed thinkers Biblical counseling resources that use a Reformed lens Practical-but-theological titles on church and ministry leadership Trusted authors: Wayne Grudem Michael Horton Timothy Keller D. A. Carson Gregg Allison J. D. Greear Tim Challies Brian Croft Many others

See the deals today. Remember, it ends November 5, 2017!

Read more

Luther Was Critical of Monasticism: A Catholic Theologian Weighs In — An Excerpt from Was the Reformation a Mistake?

ZA Blog on 3 weeks ago. Tagged under ,,.

Jesus proclaims that voluntary poverty and chaste celibacy will be the vocation of some of his followers, but not all of them. Jesus also makes clear the centrality of obedience. It makes sense, then, that the church should possess ways of living a distinctive religious life of radical poverty, chaste celibacy, and obedience—so long as the motivation for religious life is love and faith-filled desire to imitate Christ.

Martin Luther rightfully voiced his disapproval of the financial corruption, focus on works, and sexual incontinence in monasteries during his lifetime. In today’s excerpt from Was the Reformation a Mistake? Matthew Levering–though he would agree on the corruption–addresses some of the reasoning behind the formation of monasteries as a legitimate biblical communities.

9780310530718***

Numerous monasteries continue to…

Read more