Christ Alone & Catholic Sacramental Theology: A Reformation Response

Jeremy Bouma on 18 hours ago. Tagged under ,,,,.

9780310515746In order to understand the nature of the Reformers’ disagreement with Rome, you have to understand the nature of two intertwining ideas that anchor Catholic sacramental theology: the “nature-grace interdependence” and the “Christ-Church interconnection.”

Stephen Wellum traces the contours of this main point of disagreement and the Reformers’ response in his new book Christ Alone—The Uniqueness of Jesus as Savior. In it, he explores what the Reformers taught about the exclusivity and sufficiency of Christ—and why it still matters.

For the Reformers, solus Christus entails the confession of Christ’s exclusive identity and his perfect, complete, and all-sufficient work as our covenant head and mediator (258).

Below, we’ve briefly outlined Wellum’s engagement with these ideas to help you understand the Reformers’ solus Christus response to…

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Are Metaphors Inspired? – Mondays with Mounce 292

Bill Mounce on 2 days ago. Tagged under ,,.

I have been thinking a lot about some of the general issues of translation, and one of the points that keeps coming up is the issue of metaphors. I would like your opinion.

Are metaphors inspired?

I am asking if the inspired authors chose to use a metaphor to convey meaning, are we required to use a metaphor?

There are, of course, metaphors that make no sense in a target language. We have no choice with those and must interpret the metaphor. Consider the story of the prodigal son. When the father saw his prodigal son returning, he ran and “fell on his neck” (KJV, Luke 15:20). While that is a word for word translation, it certainly is not what the text means. Even the NASB, the most formal equivalent translation…

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Nobody Talks Like That! (Ps 102:12) – Mondays with Mounce 291

Bill Mounce on 1 week ago. Tagged under ,,,,.

You know you have been talking too much about translation when your spouse throws your own words back in your face. Robin was reading Ps 102:12 the other day. “But you, Lord, sit enthroned forever; your renown endures through all generations” (NIV).

“Renown,” she laughed, what’s renown? And then she quoted my common response: “That’s not English; nobody talks like that.”

Now Robin knows precisely what “renown” means. “The condition of being known or talked about by many people; fame.” But would we use a word like that? Probably not; “fame” would be the normal way of saying it.

But this brings up the interesting issue of active vs passive vocabulary. The average adult has an active vocabulary of 20,000–35,000 (read more

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Unexpected Ally: Thomas Aquinas – An Excerpt from Grace Alone

ZA Blog on 1 week ago. Tagged under ,,,.

In today’s excerpt from Grace Alone–Salvation as a Gift of God, Carl Trueman, professor of Historical Theology and Church History at Westminster Theological Seminary, gives us the background and context of Thomas Aquinas, the unexpected friend of grace alone.

***

9780310515760If the reception of Augustine’s theology of grace was subject to some confusion in the West, there were still some theologians whose teaching maintained his clear emphasis on God’s sovereignty and priority. Among these the most preeminent was Thomas Aquinas.

Most Protestants, if they have heard of Thomas Aquinas, probably regard him with some degree of suspicion. He is, after all, the great theologian of Roman Catholicism who provided the most elaborate and compelling arguments for many Roman Catholic distinctives such as transubstantiation. For many…

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Something to Brag About: Jeremiah 9:22–23 (Part 3: Articles, Particles, and Verbals, Oh My!) – Hebrew and You with Lee M. Fields

Lee Fields on 2 weeks ago. Tagged under ,,.

This month’s post concludes a post begun June 2017; please see that post for an explanation of versification. As mentioned there, this post will follow Hebrew numbering with Hebrew texts and English numbering with English texts.

today 1 today 2

Articles “A” and “The” in v. 23b–d

Hebrew and English differ in that English has both definite and indefinite articles: the and a(n), respectively. Hebrew has no indefinite article, and so it is more precise simply to say it only has the article. English translators must make choices with more options than Hebrew. The Hebrew article overlaps with English the.

The Hebrew article makes expressions definite, just as…

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What Are the Fruits of the Spirit and the Works of the Flesh?

Thomas Schreiner on 2 weeks ago. Tagged under .

Who were the Galatians?

Jesus wanted his disciples to understand that there were some who would seek to distort the gospel. He called them “false prophets,” and he told the disciples how they’d be able to differentiate them from the real thing:

“Watch out for false prophets. They come to you in sheep’s clothing, but inwardly they are ferocious wolves. By their fruit you will recognize them. Do people pick grapes from thornbushes, or figs from thistles? Likewise, every good tree bears good fruit, but a bad tree bears bad fruit. A good tree cannot bear bad fruit, and a bad tree cannot bear good fruit. Every tree that does not bear good fruit is cut down and…

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The Case of the Missing Object (Matt 5:25) – Mondays with Mounce 290

Bill Mounce on 2 weeks ago. Tagged under ,,.

I have been enjoying reading the CSB, the new version of the former HCSB. Tom Schreiner and his group of translators have done an excellent job at updating an already good translation.

I was reading in Matt 5 this morning and came across v 22. “Everyone who is angry with his brother or sister will be subject to judgment (κρίσει). Whoever insults his brother or sister, will be subject to the court (συνεδρίῳ). Whoever says, ‘You fool!’ will be subject to hellfire (τὴν γέενναν τοῦ πυρός).”

The progression of the three punishments has always been a difficult exegetical decision.…

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What Can We Learn About Walking in the Spirit from Galatians 5?

Thomas Schreiner on 2 weeks ago. Tagged under .

Who were the Galatians?

Due to the influence of law-heavy teaching, the Galatians struggled to understand how to mature as Christians. Did they become righteous by following a set of moral precepts as their forefathers believed, or was there more to it than that?

Throughout the book of Galatians, Paul teaches the Galatians about the relationship between the law and Christian living, and in the 5th chapter of his epistle to the Galatians, Paul begins to explain how the spiritual life works in relationship to Christ and the Holy Spirit.

In his online course on Galatians, Thomas R. Schreiner walks us through Galatians 5. The following post is adapted from Schreiner’s course.

By submitting your email…

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What Is the False Gospel in Galatians?

Thomas Schreiner on 2 weeks ago. Tagged under .

Who were the Galatians?

It doesn’t take too long for Paul to get to the heart of the issue in his letter to the Galatians. He’s concerned that they’re abandoning Jesus’ grace and turning to a different gospel—a false gospel.

Paul doesn’t mince words when it comes to Judaizers coming in and undermining the work he has done in Galatia. In this letter, we see Paul at his strongest and most aggressive. There is no room for a gospel that strays from the grace of Christ. As we will see, Paul feels so strongly about the good news that has been preached to the Galatians that he calls down a curse upon anyone who would dare to proffer…

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Who Were the Galatians?

Thomas Schreiner on 2 weeks ago. Tagged under .

Who were the Galatians?

If someone was to ask you who Paul wrote his epistle to the Galatians to, how would you respond? If you’re like most people, you’d probably answer that it was written to the church at Galatia, and—technically—you’d be right.

But did you know that there’s actually quite a bit of discussion around whether Paul’s letter was written to those in northern or southern Galatia? Does knowing who Paul was writing to affect how we read it? Not necessarily, but it does change the way we look at the book of Galatians in regards to Acts.

In his online course on Galatians, Thomas R. Schreiner helps us understand a little better about who Paul…

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The Role of the Old Testament Law in Galatians

Thomas Schreiner on 2 weeks ago. Tagged under .

moses-ten-commandments

Communicating the role that the law played in God’s overall plan of salvation was one of the New Testament church’s biggest challenges. As Jews accepted that Jesus was the long-awaited Messiah, they struggled to understand how to bring their Jewish roots into this new reality.

The Christian who had come out of Judaism had to reconcile their understanding of what the law actually accomplished and how it worked. In their understanding, the law purified them and made them righteous. Was that true? If not, why were they given the law?

In his online course on Galatians, Thomas R. Schreiner explains Paul’s take on the law from Galatians 3:19–20. The following post is taken from Schreiner’s course.

By…

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Zondervan Academic Titles Now Available for Libraries through EBSCO

ZA Blog on 2 weeks ago. Tagged under .

Grand Rapids, Mich., July 27, 2017 — Zondervan Academic is pleased to announce that many of its titles are now available for libraries through EBSCO’s GOBI® Library Solutions and EBSCOhost Collection Manager.

“For many years, academic librarians have requested the availability of Zondervan Academic titles from EBSCO,” says Jesse Hillman, Vice President of Marketing, Zondervan Academic. “We are thrilled that our titles will now equip students, librarians, and other users in their research.”

Librarians can now access these titles through EBSCOhost Collection Manager or GOBI®.

EBSCO is the leading provider of research databases, e-journals, magazine subscriptions, ebooks and discovery service to libraries of all kinds. For over 70 years they have partnered with libraries to improve research with quality content and technology. EBSCO offers more than a million titles from leading publishers, ensuring that valuable, trusted content can…

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